The Healing Powers of Music Therapy As an Autism Symptoms Treatment

There are many different forms of autism symptoms treatment. There are the more traditional therapies, such as applied behavior analysis (ABA) and floortime. And then there are a lot of alternative treatments as well.

The thing about all these alternative treatments is that you have to be very careful to research them before you try them, because not all of them are credible. But that said, sometimes you can find really good ones that will help your child if you look just a little outside the box.

How to Use Music Therapy to Help a Child with Autism

One such idea is music therapy. Music therapy can be surprisingly helpful as a treatment for autism symptoms. It has a way of connecting with those who have autism that can often not be achieved any other way. Those with no ability for communication have responded to and seemingly connect with music therapy.

Why is music therapy successful as an autism symptoms treatment?

People with autism often like patterns, and music is full of patterns. Music has rhythm to it. It is something that people with autism can feel. And they use a part of their brain which is entirely different than what is used for verbal communication.

Music is something that children with autism don’t have to think much about or interpret. Music moves you, and allows you to express emotions that you might not have any other way of getting out and in this way it can help as an effective autism symptoms treatment.

How exactly is music therapy implemented for autistic kids?

You may think that music therapy relies solely on learning to play an instrument, but that is not it at all. Music therapy is not instruction in music. Instead, a music therapist will use a lot of different tools, knowledge and creativity to create musical experiences where the autistic person feels comfortable, based on their needs.

Verbal Skills Not Required

One advantage to music therapy as an autism symptoms treatment is that it does not require any verbal ability. A person with autism can use a bell, bang on a piano, or shake some cymbals without needing to talk – and by doing this, they can begin to communicate with others through music. You might say that in some ways, music could be considered an ancient form of communication – perhaps one of our oldest forms.

Why is it that music therapy works so well with autistic people?

  1. Music can capture, and help maintain, attention. It will motivate and engage a person to respond and participate.
  2. Music is, in many ways, a universal language.
  3. Music gives people with autism a way to express their emotions, and to be able to identify their emotions, in a way that they might not otherwise have had the ability to do.
  4. Think of how many non-autistic people get pleasure from music. For many of the same reasons, it can be anxiety reducing for those with autism, too. Repeating the same music many times can create a sense of security and comfort in an office setting, which can make a person with autism feel more at ease and receptive to learning.

Some forms of autism symptoms treatment work better than others, but it is worth trying any that you think have merit and are able to do.

Mental Health – Easy Solution To Recover Using Music Therapy

Mental Health is an emotional and psychological state of an individual who is working at a satisfactory level of emotional and behavioral adjustment. It is a term used to describe either a level of cognitive or emotional well-being or an absence of a mental disorder. Mental health problem may include serious depression, serious anxiety, hallucinations, violent behavior or thoughts of suicide that may be recovered a lot with the help of Music Therapy as music gives soothe feeling to our mind. Mental illness ranks second in terms of causing disability.

It is an efficacious and valid treatment for people who have psychosocial, affective, cognitive and communicative needs. It may provide a means of improving mental health among people with schizophrenia, but its effects in acute psychoses have not been explored. Music therapists assess emotional well-being, physical health, social functioning, communication abilities, and cognitive skills through musical responses. Research has shown that music has a profound effect on your body and psyche. In fact, music therapy is an effective therapy of health care that uses music to heal.

There are various schools to provide these services where music therapists are often hired for music learning, which is used to strengthen non-musical areas such as communication skills, expressions and physical coordination skills that are very much important for daily life. Music therapists also offer services in psychiatric treatment centers, outpatient clinics, community mental health centers, group homes, medical hospitals, hospice, rehabilitation facilities, senior centers and other facilities.

The outcomes that are being established through music therapy are as follows:

  • Reduced muscle tension
  • Improved self-image
  • Decreased anxiety & agitation
  • Increased verbalization skills
  • Enhanced personal relationships
  • Improved group or band closeness
  • Increased motivation
  • Successful and safe emotional release
  • Better communication
  • Enhance physical rehabilitation

In short, Music Therapy sessions include the use of active music making, music listening, and discussion. Since music therapy is a powerful and enjoyable medium, unique outcomes are possible. With all these benefits that music can carry, it’s no surprise that music therapy is growing in popularity.

The Benefits of Music and Music Therapy For Children With Special Needs

Music can be a motivating and fun way to teach all children and in particular children who have special learning needs. It is unquestionable that through the medium of music many essential and enabling life skills can be learned and the benefits that playing and learning music can have on a child’s growth and development are immeasurable.

All children have the same need to express themselves and playing a musical instrument can provide an outlet for creative and emotional expression. When we think of music we don’t often think of it as therapy. But it can be.

The playing of good quality percussion instruments during music therapy sessions can be of inestimable value for children who have difficulties in hearing, seeing, moving, thinking or responding; each can experience the music in their own unique way. The music is not the goal of music therapy. Cognitive stimulation, self-expression, self-awareness, or increased motor movements are some of the goals that music therapy can focus on and the music itself is simply a tool to achieve these goals.

Listening to music for enjoyment is very beneficial but active participation is even better. For children and adolescents with cerebral palsy, playing music may be an effective way to stimulate speech development and communication skills, express emotions, develop a sense of rhythm and provide opportunity for physical, cognitive and motor development whilst creating an environment for socialisation and fun.

Every child can be helped to learn to enjoy and to become involved in music to some degree and instruments tuned to a harmonic pentatonic scale which produce a soothing sound straightaway, makes playing them an instantly gratifying experience.

Playing music and music therapy has proven to be a very effective method in dealing with autism and aspergers syndrome. Most children diagnosed with Autism or Asperger’s lack the social skills that enable them to participate fully in play and other social situations. Interestingly, many children with autism show a heightened interest in music. While they may be unable to easily communicate verbally with others, music is an avenue for many autistic people to express themselves and communicate in a non-verbal, non-threatening manner. Playing music puts the individual at ease, allowing for strides in social interactions to follow.

Easy access to musical instruments may provide an outlet that encourages children to use music to deal with emotional issues, especially when they are unable to express them through speech. Where words fail, music may be a medium through which to explore one’s inner world and experiences. Often people with developmental delays and learning disabilities such as Down’s syndrome will respond to music. The easy, non-challenging way in which pentatonic instruments can be played offers opportunities for response and expression to children and adults with such developmental delays.

Musical instruments in the classroom or playground offer blind or partially sighted children the opportunity to explore and musical sound and awareness. Instruments, which are simple to play and enable creative experimentation and tactile exploration, encourage the use of motor skills, thus developing coordination whilst stimulating the imagination.

Music is a tool that is used in pain management and healing for children undergoing medical procedures and as a comfort for those who have suffered a traumatic experience. Music can be a powerful distraction, turning the patient’s attention away from pain and promoting relaxation as well as to help ward off depression, promote movement and ease muscle tension.

The use of music in group therapy has long been advocated and practiced in the music therapy profession, in addition to the purely musical benefits, playing in an ensemble is useful for working on concepts such as cooperation with others, coordination, and a sense of accomplishment. Making music and singing songs together in a group can build a harmonious cooperative spirit of support and encouragement for everyone. Children who experience severe obstacles in forming relationships with other children, adults and their environment can achieve security and joy in making music. Music making involves many of the fundamental elements of social interaction; turn taking, listening and responding to another person can all be augmented in music therapy.

To see, hear and play musical instruments at school or in community programs is an important cultural experience for every child. While music therapy is an important discipline, you can also achieve benefits from making music on your own. Successful projects include sensory or music gardens where musical instruments have been installed outdoors, making them accessible at break times as well as for use with the curriculum. Playgrounds and outdoor spaces should be viewed as therapeutic settings and an outdoor music centre or garden could enhance learning and development for both children with and without special needs.

ADHD Natural Treatment – Music Therapy

Most children who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder go through traditional cognitive and behavioral therapy so they can readjust to the social world around them. However, behavioral therapy is not the only program that can rehabilitate children with behavioral disorders. Consider giving your child music therapy, a creative and popular approach that uses the therapeutic power of music to teach children appropriate behavior, mental skills, and avenues for expression.

It seems rather unconventional, but music therapy is a legitimate health profession backed up by scientific research and practice. Since it was first developed by Michigan State University in 1944, music therapy has helped a host of individuals overcome conditions like depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and ADHD. Children with ADHD and similar disorders have been able to harness their creative energies and skills to make positive changes in their behavior and overcome their symptoms. Music therapy can help set these changes because it uses a very effective medium – music. Music is a recognizable, non-threatening language that can establish a familiar environment conducive to learning, expression, and change. Children hardly expect to enter a doctor’s office to find out that they’ll be playing with music. The medium easily captures and sustains their natural curiosity, and they will start working on improving themselves without being aware of it.

Aside from making children more open and receptive to therapy, the approach itself can rehabilitate the brain. Both hemispheres of the brain work together to process auditory stimuli, and the mental activity involved facilitates cognitive functioning and corrects speech or language deficits. Depending on the program, music therapy can even re-train your child’s auditory receptive processes. The rhythmic component of music will also give the child a structure that organizes movement and participation, which will improve focus, impulse control, and group cohesion.

One of the misgivings parents have about music therapy is that they fear a child can only benefit from it if he or she is musically inclined. Nothing can be farther from the truth. Most children who succeeded with the help of a music therapist cannot play a single note on the piano or carry a tune. Aside from the benefits outlined above, this type of therapy gives children an avenue for creative expression when they have difficulty expressing themselves through verbal language. As for ADHD children who do have hidden musical abilities, music therapy can bring these out and encourage these children to develop their talents. But hidden talent for music or no, every child can benefit from music therapy.

Music therapy for ADHD can be done in one-on-one sessions with a therapist, or in small groups. In both instances, a music therapist will use song, instruments, and other music activities to engage a child in a structured, systematic manner. The structure of the program is important to cultivating the desired behaviors, responses, and goals. While this is happening, the program gives your child a familiar environment that encourages positive interpersonal reaction and expression. Consider using music therapy to help your child overcome ADHD naturally.